MarineBio Conservation Society

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Privacy Notice

Information Collection and Use

MarineBio.org, Inc. [MarineBio] is the sole owner of the information collected on this site. We will not sell, share, or rent this information to others in ways different from what is disclosed in this statement. MarineBio collects information from our users at several different points on our Web site.

Cookies

A cookie is a piece of data stored on the user’s hard drive containing information about the user. Usage of a cookie is in no way linked to any personally identifiable information while on our site. For instance, by setting a cookie on our site, the user would not have to log in a password more than once, thereby saving time while on our site. If a user rejects the cookie, they may still use our site. The only drawback to this is that the user may be limited by some functionality or access to only some areas of our site. Cookies might also enable us to track and target the interests of our users to enhance the experience on our site at a later date.

Log Files

We use IP addresses to analyze trends, administer the site, track user’s general movement, and gather broad demographic information for aggregate use. IP addresses are not linked to personally identifiable information.

Sharing

We might share certain aggregated demographic information with our partners on an as needed basis. This is not linked to any personal information that can identify any individual person.

Links

This web site contains links to other sites. Please be aware that we [MarineBio] are not responsible for the privacy practices of such other sites. We encourage our users to be aware when they leave our site and to read the privacy statements of each and every web site that collects personally identifiable information. This privacy statement applies solely to information collected by this web site.

Newsletter

If a user wishes to subscribe to our newsletter, we ask for contact information such as name and email address.

Correction/Updating Personal Information

If a user’s personally identifiable information changes (such as your email), or if a user no longer desires our service, we will endeavor to provide a way to correct, update or remove that user’s personal data provided to us. This can usually be done at the newsletter signup box on every page by unsubscribing or by contacting us.

Choice/Opt-out

Users who no longer wish to receive our newsletter may opt-out of receiving these communications by unsubscribing in the MarineBio Newsletter box on every page.

Notification of Changes

If we decide to change our privacy policy, we will post those changes on this page so our users are always aware of what information we collect, how we use it, and under circumstances, if any, we disclose it. If at any point we decide to use personally identifiable information in a manner different from that stated at the time it was collected, we will notify users by way of an email. Users will have a choice as to whether or not we use their information in this different manner. We will use information in accordance with the privacy policy under which the information was collected. Please also see our Terms and Conditions of Use for marinebio.org.

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